Thursday, August 8, 2013
You can never have enough art in your room! Our Street Art 5 Piece bed is the perfect way to compliment your room without throwing paint on the walls :)
www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

You can never have enough art in your room! Our Street Art 5 Piece bed is the perfect way to compliment your room without throwing paint on the walls :)

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Friday, August 2, 2013 Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Sunday, June 30, 2013

How Well Do You Know Your Campus?

Every college campus in the United States has one very sad fact in common; there is at least one area that all students know to stay away from. Maybe it’s the one spot next to the gym building that the lights don’t quite hit. Maybe it’s the block that happens to share an alleyway with the local liquor store. Either way, these unsafe places aren’t usually something that’s advertised in your college’s orientation brochure. So how the heck do you find out the right and wrong route to take before you end up learning the hard way? By following these simple tips:

1.) Ask the right questions. You might be interested in a great place to go for a run or sit and clear your head, and the person you’re asking is going to tell you just that: where an amazing place is. However, they can’t guess where you will or won’t go from there. So ask about places you shouldn’t go as well. “Is there anywhere I should avoid? Why?” Then you’ll probably get an earful about that amazing running path just south of the library…and why you should only use it before 6:00 pm.

2.) Ask the right people. Let’s go back to the subject of the running path, shall we? If your friends have only ever seen pictures of the path, that’s not a very good source. Talk to someone that goes there regularly. Talk to campus police to see if they’ve had any reports or issues there.

And speaking of campus security, be sure to ask them the same questions as in the previous point; is there anywhere you shouldn’t be going? And don’t let them give you the classic cop-out of “well, just try not to walk around alone at night in dimly lit areas.” That’s common sense, everyone knows that. You want to know where the hot spots are around campus for unfavorable conditions. Where have most of the rapes or muggings occurred. If they don’t know, have them look it up. You can wait.

3.) Do your own research. In the end, word of mouth can only get you so far. So turn to your trusted friend Google to answer a few more of your questions. Look for newspaper articles or events/clubs. Sticking with our same example of the running path, look to see if there were any reported crimes in that area in the last few years. Then look to see if there is a running group that uses that path. Go to a safe place, at a safe time, with a group of other people and there you have it; you’ve now dramatically decreased your chances of ending up in a horrible situation. 

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Thursday, June 27, 2013 Wednesday, June 26, 2013
We don’t know about you, but we would put our Backwards Dorm Wall Clock right behind the mirror in our bathroom. You’d be able to tell time as you get ready for school :). 
www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

We don’t know about you, but we would put our Backwards Dorm Wall Clock right behind the mirror in our bathroom. You’d be able to tell time as you get ready for school :). 

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Tuesday, June 25, 2013 Monday, June 24, 2013 Thursday, June 20, 2013

Pet Proof Your Home

Our pets are our family, so we decided to do a little article highlighting their safety as well. Of course we want our homes to be a safe place for them, but that can be a bit easier said than done. It’s hard to know what’s dangerous for our animals when we aren’t even sure what they’re capable of getting into. We might think we have everything in a safe location only to be surprised by a poisoned pet and a shocking vet bill. Here are a few ways to keep your home safe for all your family members, even the ones with four legs.

1.) Choose the right plants. While many plants are beautiful, not all of them belong in a home with pets. Your cats may love your lilies, but they shouldn’t be eating them, and almost all lilies are toxic to cats. Make sure you are either very aware of what plants are in your home, or at least have them moved to a safer location to avoid any issues.

2.) Secure your toiletries. Your lotions and soaps might be safe for skin contact, but they could be incredibly harmful when ingested. Plus, it’s not likely that your pet would only eat a portion. Many pets eat these things because they have a sweet, sugary taste, meaning they might eat an entire bottle if they get ahold of it. Make sure to keep them off accessible countertops and keep cabinets closed and secure.

3.) Set boundaries. Sometimes there’s just no way for you to make a room completely pet proof. Maybe you have a woodshop with an abundant supply of electric tools, or maybe you’ve got an art room with countless paints and glues. In either case, it might be a great idea to put up a gate to keep your pets out of these rooms completely. Just be sure to install the right kind of gate; a pressure mounted gate at the top of the stairs will keep it from toppling over should your pet decide to lean up against it.

4.) Beware of wires. Pets are notorious for chewing on anything they can find, and wires make perfect chewtoys. Your pets, however, have no idea just how dangerous they can be. Besides the threat of electrocution, your furry family members might panic in a pile of cords and could even result in strangling themselves. So when you hook up your new big screen television, make sure to tuck away all the wires first. Your pets will thank you for it.

5.) Size matters. Any knick-knacks or toys that would dangerous to a baby are also dangerous to your pets for the same reason: they’re a choking hazard. Keep your floors clear of anything small enough for your pet to swallow on accident. Especially puppies, since they don’t have the jaw strength to chew up larger items.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 Friday, June 14, 2013 Sunday, June 2, 2013 Wednesday, May 29, 2013

How to Condense Your Belongings

For most of us, we have some sort of room that is often devoted to just storage. And not only does that room tend to get more and more stuffed with items as time wears on, but we also avoid any opportunities to clean it out. We know what we have to do, but we just don’t want to do it.

But then we move into a new home and the thought of moving boxes of stuff we just don’t need brings us new motivation. So if you’re moving into a new home, want the use of that spare bedroom back or are simply just sick and tired at looking at a closet full of clothes you never wear, here are a few ways to get rid of the clutter:

1.) Categorize. Your first step should be to divide things into piles. Your first piles should be pretty basic and will typically fall into these five categories: Keep, Store, Sell, Donate and Trash. A good rule of thumb for keeping things it that it has to serve at least two purposes; a top that can be worn with a number of bottoms or a kitchen gadget that is constantly being used. A garlic press, for example, shouldn’t be in the “keep” section. It takes up room, has one very specific purpose, and a knife and cutting board can be used for the exact same purpose. Throw it in another pile.

One more tip: be overly cautious about what is trash. Someone you consider trash could be just what someone else is looking for. If you don’t think you can sell it at least donate it and let the people at your local shelter make the final decision.

2.) Get rid of duplicates. Chances are, you probably have more than one of one specific thing. Maybe you found three different waffle irons while going through your kitchen, or maybe you’ve come across 2 or 3 of the same movie in your collection. Either way, pick the best of all your duplicates and resort the remaining things to your Sell or Donate groups.

3.) Sell, Donate or Trash. After you’ve got the groups set up, get busy disposing of them! And if you’re like me, do it quick before you can go through them again and start changing your mind! First, drop off all the donation stuff and toss out the trash pile. That should give you a feeling of accomplishment and allow you to focus on selling what’s left. Consider if you want to sell your things online, by yard sale or even by consignment. 

4.) Organize. After you’ve gotten rid of your Donate and Trash groups and made arrangements for your Sell group, take a look at what you have left in your Keep and Store groups. Now’s the time to get organized. That fan that you found that you swear you’ll always use? Put it someone with easy access to using it! Those clothes you’ve narrowed down your closet to? Arrange them by color or by season. Getting rid of all that excess clutter won’t do you any good if whatever you have left is simply shoved in that same corner where you originally found it. 

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Do you guys have any tips for condensing your stuff?

Sunday, May 26, 2013 Saturday, May 25, 2013