Saturday, March 23, 2013 Sunday, February 10, 2013

Essential Rules for Getting Along with Roommates

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At some point in our lives, we will probably be living with roommates. Whether it’s during college, the first time we move to a new city, with people we’ve never met before or with family members, roommates have a way of being a staple in many of our lives. However, sharing your living space with someone is a bit of a risky business if you aren’t aware of a few ground rules. So before you begin critiquing any of your roommates’ characteristics, let’s make sure you’re following each of the rules listed below first.

1.) Respect Personal Space. For many of us, our bedroom is our safe haven. Completely isolated from the rest of the world, it’s the one place where we get to do literally anything we want. And just like your car feels a bit strange after someone else has been driving it, your roo can get the same feeling after someone else has been in it. So it doesn’t matter if the door doesn’t lock, don’t go into someone else’s room. And just because they give you permission to go in there once doesn’t mean they’ve given you permission to go in thereevery time from then on. If you so much need to get a pencil from their room, ask.

2.) Do your share. The housework absolutely cannot fall to one or two people, it needs to be split up between all the roommates. So what if you work long hours and are hardly home, that’s not an excuse. Even you can spend 20 minutes a week power cleaning. Do the dishes once in a while, even if you aren’t the one making them dirty. Pick up, wipe down and vacuum/Swiffer the main living space. It won’t take long, but it’ll make a huge difference in your roomie dynamic.

3.) Be open. Before anyone enters into any living arrangement, all parties involved need to know exactly what they’re getting into. Are pets allowed? What about smoking? How long is the lease? Is everyone happy with what they are going to pay and what they get in return? What about boyfriends/girlfriends/children, etc.; have you discussed who is allowed to come over? How many nights someone can stay in a row without technically contributing to the living situation?

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4.) Communicate. If there’s a problem, speak up! Holding things in has very rarely ever worked for anybody, so why start now? Just be courteous and try to see things from their point of view. Chances are, they don’t even know there’s a problem. And once you do mention something to them, give them a little bit of time to work on it. Habits are really tough to break, so they’re probably not going to get it right all the time. Be honest, be patient, and things will gradually change for the better.

5.) Relax. Living with roommates can be a stressful experience, but it really doesn’t need to be. Some of my worst living experiences have been with horrible roommates, but some of my best living experiences have also been with roommates. So go with the flow and by all means, don’t let one bad roomie experience sour you to the idea altogether.

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Do you have any roomie advice?

Saturday, January 26, 2013 Saturday, January 5, 2013

Grades came in: Time to party

ohsweetperfection:

I got a 3.5 this semester :D

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To all of you that kicked ass last semester, here’s to you and here’s to hoping next semester turns out just as awesome :). 

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

Friday, January 4, 2013

College Student Health Tips

Now just last week I posted an article about College New Year Resolutions, and not surprisingly, one of them was to get healthy. Now I get it; college is a huge life step, so why not make the best of it? Plus, since you’re not in high school anymore, this is your chance to create a new identity. It’s a new year, a new career path (you may even be starting your first semester of school in a few days) so why not start off by making yourself the healthiest ‘you’ you can be? I thought so.

But before you start off on some crazy plan (I’m going to run 14 miles a day!) and then quickly abandon it (as an avid runner even can’t commit to running 14 miles a day), let’s get a few more useful habits into place.

1.) Clarify what and why you want to change. If you think the only thing keeping you from being happy is your weight, you’re wrong. There are a lot of factors that determining your happiness and you need to address all of them. That means that by “getting healthy”, you also need to address your mental state of mind. Are you stuck in a dead-end relationship? Do something about it. Are you constantly getting taken advantage of people? Make a change. Your physical appearance, contrary to popular opinion, has nothing to do with these two things. Your weight does not determine your self-worth.

2.) Address all areas of your health. That means not just exercising more often, but watching what you eat, making sure you’re drinking enough water, getting enough sleep, managing stress better and being more aware of your mental health. All of these things combined create a healthy identity, not just one or two on their own.

3.) Be specific, and write it down. You want to work out more? Great! How much? How often? Don’t just say “more”; make a goal. Two times a week? Three times a week? An hour each time? Write that down. Or maybe it’s a fitness goal, like you want to run a 5k by the end of the month. Write that down. Maybe you want to learn how to cook and decrease the amount of meals you eat out by 50%; leaving only three times during the week where you will eat out. Write that down.

4.) Be ready for set-backs. Research shows that habits are never actually broken; they are just replaced by stronger habits. You are never actually going to lose your sweet tooth, but you will become much better about giving into it all the time. Now keep in mind, research also says that it takes roughly three weeks straight for a new habit to start becoming second nature. That means if you abandon your goals by the second week, you really haven’t even given yourself a fighting chance! So if you miss the gym one day don’t sweat it, just go the next day. Gradually, you will be able to make a change.

5.) Keep things interesting. I mentioned earlier that I’m a runner. One of my goals every year is to run 365 miles by the end of the year (1 mile per day). However, I also know that I don’t run on treadmills. I get bored and frustrated. Outside I can run 10 miles, but on a treadmill I barely make it 2 miles before I move on to something else. If I relied on treadmills there’s no way I’d reach my goal, but by creating routes around my house I’m much more likely to stick to my plan.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

What are some ways you plan on being more healthy this year?

Monday, December 31, 2012 Sunday, December 30, 2012 Saturday, December 29, 2012

College Student New Year Resolutions

Well ladies and gents, 2013 is just around the corner, and that means many of us will be sitting down, more motivated than ever, and writing down our New Year resolutions. And sure, there may be a few habits you’d like to change, but we all have to admit; that feeling of lying down to sleep at night knowing you’ve had an incredibly productive day is an amazing feeling, so wouldn’t it be nice to have that feeling more often? Of course it would! So let us give you a few more specific solutions so some of the  most common college resolutions out there and help you get on track for having the best year ever.

1.) Stop procrastinating. This is typically on every college student’s checklist, and for good reason: the amount of effort we spend putting off homework assignments is astounding. I’ve been known to clean an entire house just to avoid starting a research paper. So stop it, by forcing yourself to change your habits. Really think about what you do every day; when you’re 95 years old, are you honestly going to look back on your life and be grateful you spent all those hours watching The Real Housewives of New Jersey? Probably not. You’d probably rather you got your work done and went to the gym. And speaking of the gym…

2.) Get healthy. This will probably be on your list, but it needs to be more specific. What do you mean by “healthy”? Do you have a goal weight (say 10 pounds lighter than you are) or a goal accomplishment (run a 5k). Make sure you have shorter time frames for check-in; saying “by the end of the year” is never a good idea. Instead, set a list of smaller goals throughout the month and focus on those. And finally, how are you going to do it? Nothing just miraculously “happens”, so you need to sort out the details, like hitting them gym 3 times a week and doing at least 30 minutes of cardio activity a day. That’s a good start.

3.) Cut the drama. The new year often causes us to re-evaluate every aspect of our lives, and one of those aspects would be relationships. Do you have any that are holding you back? Perhaps a deadbeat boyfriend (or girlfriend) that sucks you dry of time, money and patience. Cut them loose, and that includes family. I had a manipulative and abusive father and five years ago I cut off all contact. It was tough, but I can honestly say I’ve been happier in the last five years that I have my entire life. It’s amazing how much every day improves when you have no one in your life that constantly ruins it.

4.) Plan your summer. Surely everyone has some version of “have an awesome summer” on their list, but no one plans for it. You will, starting now. Get a job lined up and then plan your weekends. Always wanted to go white water rafting? Want a girl’s weekend in Vegas? Want to learn how to surf? Figure out your commitments (weddings, family reunions) and book some trips on your weekends off. Like I said earlier, miraculous things don’t just happen; you have to work for them, including a kickass summer. 

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

What are some of your resolutions?

Monday, December 10, 2012 Sunday, December 9, 2012

(Now we’ve already shared this article months ago, but since finals are coming up I figured we’d post it again. It’s an oldie, but a goodie ;)). 

Writing a paper sucks, it’s just a fact of life. Now there are definitely more interesting things to write about when it comes to topics (for a psychology paper I once had to diagnose a movie character of my choice; awesome), but for the most part you want to get it done and over with so you can get back on Tumblr.

So let’s examine the issue; you’ve got 3 pages written but the paper needs to be a minimum of 5…a problem indeed. But instead of adjusting the margins, the font, or just plain adding spaces (so amateur, your professor has definitely seen this before), you’re going to need to get a little creative. Besides, you might even get a professor who’s going on word count, not page length, which means all of the previously mentioned tactics are completely useless. Here, we’ll use an “example paper” to demonstrate my point.

Let’s say we’re writing a paper, and this is all we have so far.

Writing this paper is taking up valuable time.

Now let’s make it longer.

1.) Add examples. When you make a point in your paper, it’s always smart to have an example right after it. First of all, it takes up space, and second of all, it proves that you know what you’re talking about. So let’s add an example.

Writing this paper is taking up valuable time. For example, my roommates just bought the newest Call of Duty and are currently playing it. Since I am stuck in my bedroom trying to write a paper, I’m going to have to find my way through the levels alone, without having seen their mistakes first, which is going to add up to a lot of wasted time.

2.) Add quotations. Another way to support an idea you are trying to get across is to add quotations. Did you reference a particular book? List a quotation from the author supporting your point. Let’s add it to our paper:

Writing this paper is taking up valuable time. For example, my roommates just bought the newest Call of Duty and are currently playing it. Since I am stuck in my bedroom trying to write a paper, I’m going to have to find my way through the levels alone, without having seen their mistakes first, which is going to add up to a lot of wasted time.

This point is supported by a recent statement by Doug (2012), when he said, “Holy sh*t that was sick. No way I would’ve thought to use the sniper rifle there. Good thing I saw how you did it.”

3.) State any arguments against your point. Taking both sides of an argument is sure to lengthen your paper, as well as proving to your professor that you recognize other possibilities. Let’s add to our current paper:

Writing this paper is taking up valuable time. For example, my roommates just bought the newest Call of Duty and are currently playing it. Since I am stuck in my bedroom trying to write a paper, I’m going to have to find my way through the levels alone, without having seen their mistakes first, which is going to add up to a lot of wasted time. This point is supported by a recent statement by Doug (2012), when he said, “Holy sh*t that was sick. No way I would’ve thought to use the sniper rifle there. Good thing I saw how you did it.”

However, there is also evidence to the contrary; that writing this paper is in fact not a waste of time, and playing Call of Duty is a waste of time. Proponents supporting this theory have listed reasons such as writing this paper is furthering my education (and therefore potential job prospects) while playing Call of Duty does nothing for my future employment possibilities, unless it is as a Call of Duty test subject.

4.) Restate and summarize your main points. Creating a conclusion paragraph is essay writing 101, and should always be done. But don’t just skim over your points; really make sure your summary is covering everything you want it to. Let’s add to our paper:

Writing this paper is taking up valuable time. For example, my roommates just bought the newest Call of Duty and are currently playing it. Since I am stuck in my bedroom trying to write a paper, I’m going to have to find my way through the levels alone, without having seen their mistakes first, which is going to add up to a lot of wasted time. This point is supported by a recent statement by Doug (2012), when he said, “Holy sh*t that was sick. No way I would’ve thought to use the sniper rifle there. Good thing I saw how you did it.”

However, there is also evidence to the contrary; that writing this paper is in fact not a waste of time, and playing Call of Duty is a waste of time. Proponents supporting this theory have listed reasons such as writing this paper is furthering my education (and therefore potential job prospects) while playing Call of Duty does nothing for my future employment possibilities, unless it is as a Call of Duty test subject.

In conclusion, there is an abundance of evidence both for and against the time-wasting component of writing this paper. On one hand, it has been shown that writing this paper is taking up time I could be spending doing other activities, namely, playing Call of Duty, and because of the current situation these other activities are going to take longer than originally predicted, resulting in a waste of time. On the other hand, there is also intriguing evidence that the task of playing Call of Duty is a waste of time in the first place, and writing this paper is in actually contributing to my future career goals, making it quite a productive task instead of a complete waste of time.

5.) Add descriptive words. I’m not going to list it in the example, but if you’re just a few words shy this can sometimes do that trick, and as long as you’re not going crazy (adding incredibly, mindblowingly awesome descriptive words to every single, individual, boring sentence…) it should actually give your paper an overall better flow.

With all these tricks you should be able to extend your paper in no time. I mean, take a look at our sample paper; we went from one sentence to a final product of almost 300 words. Folks, that’s almost an entire page of fluff.

Oh yeah, and make sure you proofread it.

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

What do you do to stretch a paper?

Monday, December 3, 2012

Wowza…

Now we doubt this is really a dorm room (okay there’s no way in HELL this is a dorm room…), but we just had to post. Can you imagine doing homework here? All swanky and sophisticated like? Ah well…someday…

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

Thoughts?

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Bed/Sailboat? Are you freakin’ kidding me?

Now c’mon! Who wouldn’t love to just float away on one of these during a nice calm sunday afternoon? We know it would certainly help alleviate the stress of upcoming finals…

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Kids Room…Who Cares?

We’re pretty sure this is a kid’s room (hence the Buzz Lightyear on the chair), but we still think this would make a pretty kickass dorm room! Room enough for one, small enough to keep clean and ample storage. Sign us up!

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Happy Halloween

Here’s hoping your pumpkins come out just as good as these ones and that any crazy Halloween Parties you attend end with you safe and sound with some awesome memories :). 

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Anyone have any great carving pics to share?

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Does Your School Need an Update?

I’m sure you have all heard the phrase, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” at one point or another. And while this phrase is certainly useful in certain occasions, there are situations when this way of thinking is downright dangerous. Your school’s role in the level of your safety, unfortunately, happens to be one of them.

Folks, let’s get completely honest for a second here: the world is changing and it’s changing fast. If your school isn’t continually updating their safety procedures, you are in danger. In fact, you’re probably in more danger than you even realize.

An example you say? Why certainly!

Just this month, a student was raped, in her dorm, by four unknown students that did not reside in that dorm. Just how did they get in? They were signed in, by a student that didn’t know them. Now even though this is a blatant violation on both the part of the student signing in people they didn’t know as well as the individual that let them go (they required only 3 out of the 4 students to sign in), there’s an even larger problem at stake. All it took was for a few people to convince someone to sign them in and the entire dorm was at their mercy. Now I don’t know about you, but I’m the kind of person that jumps at the chance to help someone out. Of course I tell myself I would never sign in someone I don’t know, but change the circumstances a little bit and I easily could’ve been in the same situation.

What if it was snowing outside and they just wanted to sit in the lobby? I’d sign them in so they could sit where it was nice and warm. Sure it meant they could go upstairs, but I’d trust them not to. Bad idea? Definitely.

The problem here lies mostly with the school. A policy that requires you to be signed in by someone you may or may not know means it just takes one little white lie to get you in the door. In this case, the school is revisiting their security policy as well as conducting regular floor meetings to reiterate the school’s safety policies.

So what do you think should happen? Should the student that signed the individuals in be punished? What if the student did know them and they ended up raping someone without the student’s knowledge, should they still be punished?

Do you have any ideas for a possible policy change that might prevent this sort of thing from occurring in the future? What kind of dorm security policy to you have at your school? Do you think it’s adequate or that it needs to be updated?

Let us know, we’d love to hear your opinions on this matter! 

In the meantime, don’t forget to check out our store (www.secureoncampus.com) to pick up some personal safety equipment of your own like various personal alarms and pepper spray