Sunday, July 7, 2013

Keep Your Stuff From Getting Stolen Over Summer Break

One thing about college that we can all agree is a major downer, is the lack of privacy: privacy from our friends, our roommates and even authority figures, like our RAs. The truth is, hardly anything is private for a college student. In addition, anything remotely embarrassing or incriminating isn’t simply found and then laughed off, but most likely but online for all to see. You aren’t just protecting you and your stuff from your two roommates down the hall, but also from millions of people in the online community. So yes, you need some serious security measures. Thankfully, we’ve got you covered.

Keep your valuables safe. We’ve got plenty of dorm safes, dorm trunks and laptop safes at www.secureoncampus.com. However, just having a safe doesn’t necessarily mean you’re protected. You’ll want to place it somewhere that isn’t going to tempt everyone that walks by your room. Nothing says “I dare you to try and steal me” quite like a safe sitting in plain few in an open room. Use your head. At least put it somewhere that won’t tempt the drunk idiot that got lost between the 2nd and 3rd floor and is just looking for something stupid to do.

Set an alarm. Trust us, at some point or another, no matter how much you trust your roomie, someone will try to get into your room. It’s not the first time you should be worried about though. The first time they usually just need to borrow a pencil, or take back that calculator you borrowed from the night before. It’s later that they start borrowing clothes (or stealing clothes, depending on how well you both get along) and using your computer. In the course of three very short, stress inducing months, everything you own could literally be fair game.

An alarm lets people know when they’ve reached a limit. Honestly, not everyone means to snoop; it’s just slippery slope of confusing which side of the room is your own; a “what’s mine is yours” kind of syndrome. They don’t have to know the alarm is yours; let them believe it’s the school’s alarm that goes off when you try to force a locked door. That’ll show em’.

Stay updated. Ever heard of the Law of Entropy? It’s the theory that things left unattended will eventually move in the direction of chaos. Stacks of books will eventually fall over and photos will eventually fall off of your walls and onto the floor. You can’t just leave everything and expect it to be in the same condition as when you return. So have someone you trust check in from time to time. An RA perhaps, that already has your room key anyway. This will also deter people from thinking your place is completely deserted.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Monday, July 1, 2013 Sunday, June 23, 2013

How to Pack for a Move

Moving can be a lot more exciting than people give it credit for. A new house, a new job; whatever the reason, there are plenty of new things to look forward to! Packing up everything you own, however, is not nearly as enjoyable. We completely understand the feeling. Nonetheless, just because you hate packing doesn’t mean you should do a poor. Otherwise, you’ll just end up with more frustration when you can’t find anything you need and end up making more than one trip for stuff you really should’ve gotten rid of years ago. So here’s a few tips to making the process as painless as possible:

1.) Clean out the junk. Be stern with yourself in this part of the process. Do you really need? Have you used it within the past year? If you already have one waffle iron that you constantly use, why do you need the other two? For that once in a lifetime occasion when 50 people come over all demanding waffles at the same time? No, that doesn’t count. Toss the other two.

2.) Scrub what you have left. This is simple; you’re moving to a brand new location that has probably been scrubbed top to bottom, so why would you unpack a bunch of dusty items as soon as you take one step into the door? Trust us; it’ll be worth it to unpack clean, dust-free items in your new home. You’re going to need to clean them at some point, why not do it now when you’re scrubbing the rest of your home as well?

3.) Wrap your delicates. It might seem like a waste of time, especially if you’re just moving down the street, but it’s best to be a bit more careful when it comes to your more fragile items. If it’s truly something irreplaceable, you might want to consider not packing it at all, and letting it travel with you to your new destination.

4.) Label everything.And we mean everything. There’s nothing more frustrated than trying to find a single coffee much amidst what feels like 1,000 boxes all labeled “kitchen”. Give every box a label and a number, that way if one is missing you exactly what items are missing and what you will need to replace.

5.) Leave it to the experts. Sometimes it’s worth it to let the experts take care of the larger, more expensive or difficult to move items. That big screen television of yours might be worth the extra charge to the movers if they can guarantee safe transport. Other items, like your piano or extra large, awkward furniture should always be left to the professionals.

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Pet Proof Your Home

Our pets are our family, so we decided to do a little article highlighting their safety as well. Of course we want our homes to be a safe place for them, but that can be a bit easier said than done. It’s hard to know what’s dangerous for our animals when we aren’t even sure what they’re capable of getting into. We might think we have everything in a safe location only to be surprised by a poisoned pet and a shocking vet bill. Here are a few ways to keep your home safe for all your family members, even the ones with four legs.

1.) Choose the right plants. While many plants are beautiful, not all of them belong in a home with pets. Your cats may love your lilies, but they shouldn’t be eating them, and almost all lilies are toxic to cats. Make sure you are either very aware of what plants are in your home, or at least have them moved to a safer location to avoid any issues.

2.) Secure your toiletries. Your lotions and soaps might be safe for skin contact, but they could be incredibly harmful when ingested. Plus, it’s not likely that your pet would only eat a portion. Many pets eat these things because they have a sweet, sugary taste, meaning they might eat an entire bottle if they get ahold of it. Make sure to keep them off accessible countertops and keep cabinets closed and secure.

3.) Set boundaries. Sometimes there’s just no way for you to make a room completely pet proof. Maybe you have a woodshop with an abundant supply of electric tools, or maybe you’ve got an art room with countless paints and glues. In either case, it might be a great idea to put up a gate to keep your pets out of these rooms completely. Just be sure to install the right kind of gate; a pressure mounted gate at the top of the stairs will keep it from toppling over should your pet decide to lean up against it.

4.) Beware of wires. Pets are notorious for chewing on anything they can find, and wires make perfect chewtoys. Your pets, however, have no idea just how dangerous they can be. Besides the threat of electrocution, your furry family members might panic in a pile of cords and could even result in strangling themselves. So when you hook up your new big screen television, make sure to tuck away all the wires first. Your pets will thank you for it.

5.) Size matters. Any knick-knacks or toys that would dangerous to a baby are also dangerous to your pets for the same reason: they’re a choking hazard. Keep your floors clear of anything small enough for your pet to swallow on accident. Especially puppies, since they don’t have the jaw strength to chew up larger items.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Thursday, June 6, 2013

3 Home Maintenance Tips to Keep Your Home Safe While You’re Away

There are countless times during the year when you might have to leave your home for an extended period of time. Perhaps you’re heading home to help out with a family issue, you need to head out of town for a job interview or maybe you just got lucky and happen to be going on an epic (and probably very well deserved) vacation. Regardless of the reason, if you don’t have roommates (or your roommates are also taking a leave of absence at the same time), there are a few home maintenance tasks you need to take care of before you walk out the door.

1.) Take care of perishable foods. There aren’t many worse things than arriving home after a couple weeks only to walk into a kitchen filled with rotting, diseased food. Not only will your house reek, but you’ll also be attracting various pests, such as mice, cockroaches and fruit flies. So before you take off, make sure your perishable foods are kept to a minimum. Clean out everything in the refrigerator and make sure no fresh fruit or vegetables are left out on the counter. No need to throw it all out; you can have a house-sitter take whatever they would like or have a dinner party the night before you go. On the menu: anything that won’t make it until you return home.

2.) Minimize your energy use. If you’re not going to be home there’s no point in running energy to half the things you own. Unplug everything that isn’t necessary for your home’s maintenance while you’re away. Alarm clocks, lamps, blow dryers, exercise equipment, and make sure all the lights are off in rooms you won’t be using. Even if something is switched off, there is still energy running to it until it’s unplugged. Along with cutting down on your energy bill, unplugging everything will also help prevent electrical fires in your absence.

Keep any safety lights on, however. You’ll want any motion activated lights to be up and running. If you have any alarms or security cameras of course you should keep them plugged in.

3.) Set your heat to the right temp. If you’ve taken care of the perishable food and have no plants or animals to worry about, you won’t necessarily need to worry about keeping it cool. However, if you let it cool down too much, you could be in a world of hurt. Even though the summer months are known for warmer weather, you’ll want to make sure your thermostat is set to at least 60 degrees to prevent frozen pipes of any kind. 

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Friday, May 17, 2013

The Secret Storage Space You’re Forgetting About

Storage? For a safety blog?

One of the biggest safety concerns is whether or not you can store your stuff in a private place. If you were to ask 1,000 people that lived in a small space what their #1 wish would be, the vast majority of them would probably tell you they would like more storage. And in college, more storage becomes more important than ever. You’re slowly growing a collection of your own things, but you also probably have endless boxes of childhood knick-knacks sitting at your parents’ house as well. And let’s face it, between your nosy roommates and snooping RAs, it can be tough to find a bit of privacy in your own room. However, after you’ve already packed your closets as full as they can get an crowded every junk drawer in your home, you start looking for other options. So where’s the one place you can hide your stuff without someone else finding it?

The stairs.

Sound crazy? Probably. Of all the places in the home you’d like to keep clear of clutter, the stairway is probably priority #1. But we’re talking about a sneakier version of storage than just stacking things along your stairway. We’re talking about reinventing the idea of storage and applying it to a wasted space in your home. Read on.

1.) As individual drawers. It doesn’t take much to turn each step into a drawer, and you’ll never even notice the change. When all the drawers are closed your staircase will look exactly as before, plus it gives you the chance to do something with one of the most awkward spaces I your house.

2.) As shelves. There is no need for the sides of your stairway to be a blank wall or empty space. Adding some edges or shelves will give you space to put some of your smaller items. Just make sure the shelves and items are arranged in a uniform way to prevent the look of extra clutter.

3.) Reconfigure storage bins as stairs. Pretty much anything can work as a stairway if it gradually raises in elevation, one step at a time. So don’t limit yourself to the traditional look. Creating steps out of wooden storage crates can provide an interesting look and still get the job done.

4.) Slide-under storage units. There are plenty of storage units that come with wheels on the bottom. Simply order a couple of units measuring the same width as your staircase but varying in height and store them underneath your stairway. You’ll have all your things organized and easily accessible.

5.) Lift tops. Much like the drawer idea, turning the top of each step into a lift-able lid will also provide you with plenty of extra storage space. And no one will ever know, except for the face that the rest of your house will be incredibly less cluttered since a great deal of your belongings have been moved to their new secret storage area.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Thoughts?

Sunday, May 12, 2013

How to Confront a Bad Roommate

Ah, bad roommates. At some point in our lives, we will probably all have a bad roommate. It will either be our friend that we never imagined was so messy, the relative that has an unbelievable disregard for privacy or the stranger that moved in when we were completely desperate. Either way, every roommate cannot be perfect, so when things get to be too unlivable, it becomes necessary to confront the other person. Of course there is a right and a wrong way to do this, and the wrong way can make things much, much worse (if that’s even possible), so here are some tips to make this more of a friendly discussion than a confrontation:

1.) Pick the right place and time. Don’t bombard your roommate at 2:00 in the morning just as they walk in the door from an all-night study session during finals week. Instead, schedule a time in the future to talk about the issues. And don’t worry about keeping it all secretive; chances are your roommate knows you both need to talk too. A good idea is to schedule it for a time when the both of you can relax, like Friday night after you both get home from work. That’ll give you the chance to talk things through and then even go out for a beer afterward.

2.) Say what you need to say. There is no point in having this discussion if you just casually browse over your points. If you’re upset about something, you need to address it. Otherwise, they might not even know it’s a problem, will keep doing it, and this meeting will have been completely useless. If you need to make a list, do that; just so long as you find a way to say what you need to say.

3.) Listen. Every story has too sides. Maybe they never load the dishwasher because they have no idea how a dishwasher works. No matter how silly it may sound, you have no idea what their backstory may be. Allow them a chance to explain their behavior, and then don’t get defensive if they have a few problems with your behavior as well. You’re not perfect either, you know.

4.) Be ready to compromise. Living with another person means you aren’t always going to get your way. However, you both can meet in the middle, so be ready to give a little bit in one area in order to get a little in another.

5.) Plan something for after. Some talks are better ended when each person goes their separate way for a night (which is completely understandable) and some conversations are best ended when each roommate goes out for a beer and gets over the whole thing. Planning for something to do will give you a way out either way, you just have to choose whether or not to invite them after your talk.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Thursday, April 18, 2013

3 Ways to Protect Your Home from Theft

Did you know roughly 1.6 million residential burglaries occur in the US every year? Of course we’re not saying that to scare you, we’re telling you that so you’ll be aware of the risks. Home theft does happen, and even if you always hope it doesn’t happen to you, the truth it is at some point in time someone will most likely look at your home as a potential target. In those cases, here the top three ways of protecting yourself and your belongings from outside intruders:

1.) Give a “lived in” feel. A “lived in” feel means it looks like someone is home at all times. Things like keeping the mail from building up on the front porch or having your neighbor park their car in your driveway when you’re gone for the weekend give the impression that someone is home. And for longer periods of time, making sure your yard is maintained and is also a simple tip to make it look like your home isn’t completely abandoned.

Another great tactic is to use light to your advantage. Motion lights outside your home are an easy way to spook anyone that might be scoping your place out. Even if you aren’t home, it still shines some light on them for other people in the area to see. In addition, set your lights and television to times that come on and off at various times. A potential burglar is much more likely to go for the dark and quite home at 9:00 at night rather than the one with lights and an active television.

2.) Protect your valuables. Leaving your laptop on the dining room table right next the front window can often be just asking for trouble. Instead, make your home appear less tempting. Purchase an entertainment cabinet with doors that close over your television when you’re done watching it and have your valuables in a well-hidden area that isn’t the cookie jar, under your mattress or the freezer. A great trick is to have an empty safe in plain view while you keep your valuables in a much more hidden safe. Thieves tend to take the safe and run, thinking they’ve already hit the jackpot, when really they’ve only gotten away with a free safe.

3.) Get to know your neighbors. By having a good relationship with the people around you, they will better be able to tell when someone isn’t right at your home. The better they know you, the better they know the people around you. They know what your friends and family all drive and they know when a strange car is lurking around your place. It can be very comforting knowing someone is looking out for your home when you have to leave town for a few days.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Forgotten Questions for Screening Potential Roommates

So it looks like you need a roommate. Maybe you like the idea of paying less in rent and utilities every month or maybe you’re just sick of making funny jokes every night and having no one around to laugh at them. Either way, you’ve started searching for a roommate. Luckily, you’ve probably found a few potentials.

However, even though you’ll probably ask them the basic questions (do you have pets, are you a smoker, etc.), there are a few additional questions you need to ask before you truly decide to live with this person.

1.) Do you use any drugs? Asking “Are you a smoker?” covers the basics, but it’s leaving out quite a bit of other things. Marijuana is technically a drug, and even if you’re cool with it, if your roommate admits to using it that means they’re going to be keeping some of it in your house. Marijuana is still very illegal in many states, which means if it’s in your house you are also at risk.

2.) Are you okay with my pet? You might be okay with their pet hamster, but will they be okay with your 16 pound cat that has a tendency for ripping lids off of cages? Just as they have to be forthcoming, you have to be forthcoming as well. Otherwise you could have some serious issues on move-in day.

live lavish

3.) Why did you leave your last residence? This question is essential. Of course you are going to do a background check with every applicant (you are, right?), so this question will not only let the explain themselves if something unsavory were to come up, but it will also prove whether they are honest or not in the first place. And don’t let them get away with a vague, “Oh I don’t know, I just had to leave.” You have every right to know the details. Plus, you need to be aware of badmouthing; this is just like a job interview, and badmouthing previous employers is never a good sign.

4.) What are your other expenses? This might sound nosy, but the question is absolutely necessary. Your rent may be quite low for the area, but if they’re paying thousands of dollars off in student loans and credit card debt, your measly $300 a month might be the one thing they plan on skimping on every month.

5.) How do you like to spend your free time? This should give you an idea of what kind of noise/activity level you’re going to be dealing with. If they say they love to cuddle up with a good book and a cup of tea on their days off, that’s much different than the roommate that says they like to “have a good time” on the weekends.

And don’t forget; for dorm safety items (like pepper spraysafes and personal alarms), check out our store at www.secureoncampus.com, and for dorm decorations (like dorm lightingfun drinking games, and wall decals) check out our store at www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com!

Thursday, April 4, 2013
nexttoicarus:

How I feel with anyone I meet in college

We’re pretty sure this is how everyone feels when they meet new people in college…us included!
www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

nexttoicarus:

How I feel with anyone I meet in college

We’re pretty sure this is how everyone feels when they meet new people in college…us included!

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

Monday, March 25, 2013

4 Surprising Ways You Might be Violating Your Lease

People never think they’re in violation of their rental agreement, but in reality, many people are. Think about it; when you signed your lease, you were probably in a hurry to begin with. You were probably excited about moving into a new place and most likely didn’t read everything word for word. Chances are you took the summarized version from whoever was explaining the lease and signed on the dotted line as quickly as possible. In addition, if you’ve lived somewhere for an extended period of time, there are certain factors that you might have completely forgotten about. So here are a few ways you might be in violation of your lease without even knowing it:

1.) You let your buddy crash on your couch for a couple weeks. Do you have a friend that needs a place to stay while they’re on the hunt for a new place? Sure you do, and it’s only common courtesy to offer up your couch, right? Well, not quite. Turns out, your lease probably has a limit for how long company is allowed to stay at one time. This might sound crazy, but your landlord has good reasons for following this rule; mainly, more people equals more wear and tear on the apartment and they can’t hold your random roommate accountable for any damages.

2.) You use the spare room as a home office. Your lease might specify that this particular home only be used for residential purchases, which means any business run out of it would be a violation of your agreement. It’s really not too much of a problem if it’s just you and a computer, but if you have clients coming and going you could have a problem on your hands.

3.) You let someone keep an eye on your place while you leave town for a few months. It might sound like a strange scenario, but it’s actually quite common for people to have to leave their residences for extended periods of time. Maybe you get married and go on your honeymoon, maybe you need to go home to see family for a few weeks or maybe you decided to spend summer vacation with a friend in Seattle. Either way, you have to notify your landlord of extended periods of leave so they can have access to the premise and keep it properly maintained. Your friend might collect your mail for a few weeks, but if a pipe bursts on the inside they most likely won’t be worrying about it too much.

4.) Your friend stops by with her new puppy. Sure your lease says you can’t have any pets, but that also extends to any friends and family that might stop by with their adorable new furry family member. If your landlord even catches them standing in the doorway holding a pet you could be liable for a $100 fine.

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com

Do you have any rental stories where you got in trouble for something you didn’t even know you could get into trouble for?

Sunday, March 24, 2013

Making Guests Comfortable at Your Place

image

No one wants to be that house. You know the one; the one that everything avoids going to for a occasions or celebrations. You want to know that if you’re going to have people over they will enjoy themselves, not countdown the seconds until they can leave. Of course no matter how amazing of a host you are, your home might be giving off the wrong signals without you even knowing it, so here are a few ways to make sure guests will feel completely comfortable spending time in your home.

1.) Get rid of odors. Odors are #1 on the list of what makes people uncomfortable in unfamiliar homes. Whether it’s something that you cooked last night, your pets or your kids, odors can drive a person screaming for the door. The downside is many people are completely unaware of the odors in their home. If you’re a new parent you might be completely oblivious to the fact that your whole house smells like sour milk. If you want an honest opinion, have a trusted friend come over and assess the situation. Then take their advice to heart. You asked them to be honest…

2.) Clean up. It’s only common courtesy! We all understand when we drop by someone’s house unexpectedly that it might not be in tip top shape, but when we’re invited somewhere ahead of time and the place is a mess it’s just plain awkward. You don’t have to do a floor to ceiling scrub, but you should make sure things are picked up and put away. That means no dirty dishes on the kitchen table and no dirt socks in the living room.

image

3.) Have somewhere for them to sit. A friend of mine always invites people over for a movie or game night, but we rarely take him up on the offer. It’s not that we don’t want to hang out (we really do), but his house has no room to hang out. He has two chairs and a loveseat in the living room and then all that’s left is a few feet of floor space. Unless you want to watch the movie from the kitchen, your options are pretty limited.

4.) Let them take care of themselves. Have some cups and a pitcher of ice water out on the counter and some snack food to nibble on. Part of the reasons guests feel uncomfortable is they don’t like asking for something to eat or drink in some else’s home. So have it already out for them. If they’re hungry or thirsty they can help themselves.

5.) Keep your pets and kids under control. You may allow your dogs on your lap, but your guest’s lap is a different story altogether. In addition, if your kids are old enough to know what’s going on, make sure they’re aware of basic rules, like not interrupting or climbing on people that come over.

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

Friday, March 22, 2013 Thursday, March 21, 2013
jennamartinphotography:

Here’s the official flyer! I can’t believe how fast spots are filling up, I can’t wait for summer roadtrips!!
And if you’re looking to qualify, go here to my Facebook page! No Facebook? No Problem! Simply email me for more info. Better hurry though!!
Are you ready for summer?

This is that thing we were telling you guys about! Cool, right?
REBLOG if you live in one of these states, one of your followers might be engaged and broke and forever thankful to you!

jennamartinphotography:

Here’s the official flyer! I can’t believe how fast spots are filling up, I can’t wait for summer roadtrips!!

And if you’re looking to qualify, go here to my Facebook page! No Facebook? No Problem! Simply email me for more info. Better hurry though!!

Are you ready for summer?

This is that thing we were telling you guys about! Cool, right?

REBLOG if you live in one of these states, one of your followers might be engaged and broke and forever thankful to you!

Thursday, March 14, 2013
If there’s one thing about college that’s certain, it’s the fact that photos from home are like gold. Trust us, you’re seriously going to need a ton of ways to display them, and our Laurel Photo Display is one classy way to do it. 
www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 
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If there’s one thing about college that’s certain, it’s the fact that photos from home are like gold. Trust us, you’re seriously going to need a ton of ways to display them, and our Laurel Photo Display is one classy way to do it. 

www.thegoodlifeoncampus.com 

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